Aircraft Display Collection


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1934 Homebuilt
This is the oldest known home built aircraft in Nova Scotia. It was constructed by Charles Craig of Truro, but was never completely finished. It is believed to be based on "Lincoln Sport" biplane design and has been built-up using original components that had been stored in an attic for over fifty years. The undercarriage, engine and engine cowling are not original, but were added by museum member Doug Ordinal in a manner to suggest what they may have looked like. It was decided to leave the fabric covering off in order to show the construction methods and operating surfaces, as well as Mr. Craig's workmanship. The home built was donated by Mrs. Clark X.L. Craig, in 1984
1934 Homebuilt
This is the oldest known home built aircraft in Nova Scotia. It was constructed by Charles Craig of Truro, but was never completely finished. It is believed to be based on "Lincoln Sport" biplane design and has been built-up using original components that had been stored in an attic for over fifty years. The undercarriage, engine and engine cowling are not original, but were added by museum member Doug Ordinal in a manner to suggest what they may have looked like. It was decided to leave the fabric covering off in order to show the construction methods and operating surfaces, as well as Mr. Craig's workmanship. The home built was donated by Mrs. Clark X.L. Craig, in 1984
1934 Homebuilt
This is the oldest known home built aircraft in Nova Scotia. It was constructed by Charles Craig of Truro, but was never completely finished. It is believed to be based on "Lincoln Sport" biplane design and has been built-up using original components that had been stored in an attic for over fifty years. The undercarriage, engine and engine cowling are not original, but were added by museum member Doug Ordinal in a manner to suggest what they may have looked like. It was decided to leave the fabric covering off in order to show the construction methods and operating surfaces, as well as Mr. Craig's workmanship. The home built was donated by Mrs. Clark X.L. Craig, in 1984
Bell 206 B Jet Ranger
The 206 was Bell's most successful helicopter since the Model 47 and became one of the most popular helicopter ever produced. Our machine, C-FDOI, was built in 1973 and purchased by the Canadian Coast Guard. It was used to supply ships, maintain lighthouses and perform general utility duties. It's last base was Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. However, it had flown most of it's service life out of Newfoundland, where it was involved in a notable rescue effort. In 1978 our Jet Ranger airlifted 42 people off the sinking C.N. Ferry, the "William Carson". In 1987, while performing general utility duties at a lighthouse, its rotors struck an object causing costly transmission damage. Being near the end of it's service life, it was struck off charge. C-FDOI was acquired by the Museum in 1988.
BAe 146 Cockpit
ACAM - Models in the air
ACAM - Aircraft Hanger
ACAM - Aircraft Hanger
ACAM - Aircraft Hanger
ACAM - Aircraft Hanger
ACAM - Aircraft Hanger
ACAM - Aircraft Hanger
Bell 47-J-2 Ranger - Helicopter
This Helicopter is serial # 1839 registration CF-CAF, which was a Canadian Coast Guard machine based in the Atlantic region during the types service with the Coast Guard.
Bell 47-J-2 Ranger - Helicopter
ACAM - Silver Dart Gallery
ACAM - Silver Dart Gallery
ACAM - Silver Dart Gallery
ACAM - Silver Dart Gallery

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